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Vote Fraud Exposed in Pembroke Council Race (Part 1)

(Raleigh, NC)-FEB 13, 2014—People who honestly study election fraud often worry that the biggest victims of vote fraud are “the poor,” because (the reasoning goes) they are easily frightened out of doing anything about it.

Nothing has confirmed that myth better than the November 2013 Town Council elections in Pembroke, NC. The race was tied at 299 after two recounts; so the winner, decided by cutting a deck of cards, was incumbent Councilman Allen Dial.

Before the Dial camp could finish their high fives, the challenger, Theresa Locklear, filed an official protest, exposing numerous irregularities. While there is still much to uncover on the extent of fraud in that race, the evidence in the transcribed hearings points to some serious abuses.

One sworn witness said Mr. Dial knowingly transported a former resident, still registered from her Pembroke address, to vote in the Town Council race. . . even though she had lived outside the town limits, “oh for about a year [to] two years.” [Note: Entire transcript is linked at bottom of this page.]

We hope the SBI cares how she testified of Mr. Dial’s coaching her during their ride.

“Did he talk with you any at all,” asked an attorney for the Ms. Locklear, “on the way down here to vote?”

“Yes, Sir,” the witness answered. “About the change of address . . . he said I could use the address that I had been using from [she gave her previous, local address].”

“Was anything mentioned about changing your address or anything?”

“No sir,” she answered.

“Was anything mentioned to claim your old address?”

“Mr. Dial just told me to just leave my address the way it was.”

In a race this close, the testimony of that single witness was enough to change the outcome, but something more sinister became apparent as the hearing proceeded.

According to testimony from Hal Kinlaw, the attorney representing Robeson County, approximately 30 subpoenas were unable to be served because the witnesses couldn’t be located.

Several low-income voters had been challenged over their public housing residency and most of the challenges were sustained because of widespread intimidation over testifying.

Mr. Lemark Harris, Executive Director of the Pembroke Housing Authority, was a frequent witness at the hearing because (it was alleged) the challenged voters no longer lived in public housing.

While it wasn’t clear exactly who was rounding up the voters and “hauling” them to the polls, the pattern was obvious: poor people were abused.

The investigation threatened any voter staying in Pembroke public housing without being on the lease. By law, such unauthorized guests, along with any children involved, would be ejected from public housing.

While that’s a big reason for witnesses to hide from process servers, Mr. Harris had another reason: witness intimidation.

“These folks have been intimidated,” he testified. “I’ve heard that on the street. I mean, I’ve heard that from everywhere.”

“What have you heard, specifically, [as] it relates to these individuals voting with these addresses?”

“Don’t go down there,” he said, “they’ll lock you up. . . . somebody will get evicted.”

Exactly who was intimidating those vulnerable voters is for the SBI and the District Attorney to decide (and prosecute); but determining the extent of the illegal voting is something our research team will continue investigating in the coming weeks.

Without giving away any of our analytical procedures, this entire process is like an episode of CSI: The data is telling us about the crime. Our challenge is to understand what it’s saying.

Because of investigative work like this, the NAACP has poured vast resources into destroying the Voter Integrity Project through legal harassment and intimidation.

We ask patriotic citizens everywhere to please help us resist the NAACP’s bullying by visiting our crowd-funding site and making a donation for the cause of open and honest elections.

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Link to transcript of hearing: PROTEST BOE HEARING 11-22 23-2013

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