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Couple Z: The Voters Who “Rarely” Cheat

March 5, 2020 (Raleigh) What are the odds that a lowly poll greeter, working a three-hour shift on two separate days and at two different voting locations would notice the same couple going in to vote?

How do election officials investigate this crime?

It would be easy to shoot holes in her story since she didn’t actually watch them vote. But why don’t you decide for yourself?

Last week, Monday 2/24 I was a greeter outside [redacted] from 12 Noon to 3:30 pm.  It was a raw rainy day and not many people came out to vote.  A large [redacted] SUV pulled up close to the polling door and a man and woman exited the car.  I greeted them and offered them candidate material which they didn’t want.  They were both Caucasian senior citizens about 70 years of age.  I remembered him because he was slightly bent over and had a pronounced limp.  He had a 2 or 3 day grey stubble on his face and grey hair combed close to his scalp.  I believe he had blue eyes.  His wife or female friend had very short platinum or grey hair.
 
Today, March 3, I was a greeter at [redacted] in the [redacted] area from 11:45 am to 2:45 pm and the same gentlemen and woman pulled up and parked close to the door.  In fact, I recognized him (he was slightly bent over and had a limp not as pronounced as last week, but it was still there) and said to him that I recognized him from last week at Archer Lodge which he angrily denied.  He told me he was a Liberal and didn’t want the candidate brochures I had.  He wore baggy jeans on both days and a nylon jacket.
 
I began to wonder whether they were voting twice or perhaps even everyday during early voting and wrote down the make and model along with his vehicle licence plate number.  It looked to be [redacted].

(Specific details redacted to avoid compromising the investigation.)

As we’ve learned in the past, when we report cases like this to election officials, they love to sequester the evidence and prevent others [like us] from confirming their work.

“You see, Mr. DeLancy,” they would say, “this is part of a criminal investigation and we cannot share that information with you.”

Just this week, a certain Wizard of Smart told me that a crime like this “rarely happens.” As proof, he asked the rhetorical question, “why would anybody take the risk?”

In hopes of showing you the answer to that question, we will develop a way to follow this investigation before election officials can hide the crime and continue downplaying the frequency of voter-impersonation fraud.

After all, if this crime doesn’t happen, then there’s no need to make those silly voter ID laws. And then, just to prove how much they mean it, they spend tens of millions of dollars to stop those laws in court.

There are a lot of pitfalls along the road from reporting the crime to prosecution getting a prosecution. But we will do our best to update you as conditions develop.

If you want to follow this story with us, bookmark the site and occasionally use our site’s search engine. Search on the term, “Couple Z.”

~ jd